Showing posts with label Intel Curie. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Intel Curie. Show all posts

Tuesday, September 5, 2017

Updates: Intel Joule, LoRa, Arduino and Protocase

Blog Break

It has been a while since I posted a blog entry.  I have been knee-deep in a challenging internal project and haven't had much time to come up for air.  Today, I've got a chance to reflect on some of the things that have been happening here at Gumstix and share my perspective with you.

First, there's the EOL announcement from Intel that blindsided the x86-focused IoT community:
 the Joule, Edison, and Curie modules are soon to be no more than a footnote in the history of embedded computing.

Also, Just recently, hardware support for LoRaWAN was added to the Geppetto module library and 3 LoRa boards were released.  I got to play with that quite a bit.  It also brought with it an ATmega32U4 Geppetto module, supplanting the Curie module as our primary Arduino-compatible MCU.

Finally, I've been talking a lot with Protocase.  These guys are cool.  They provide design and production services for custom small-run enclosures, rackmounts, brackets, and consolets. I'm very excited to see what they're making for me.

Intel EOL Announcements and Me

I'll admit it, I took the Intel Joule news harder than maybe I should have.  I spent a lot of time working with it and it's carrier boards.  I was looking forward to putting the GadgetDrone in the air with the AeroCore 2 for Joule, the Caspa HD and one of the RealSense point cloud cameras we have at the office.  I liked the idea of setting up my Workstation board in a 3D-printed enclosure as a Yocto build slave.  Oh and I still hope to test the Caspa 4K's "tone-mapping (Er, I mean HDR) Video" mode.


I was also sad to see the Curie go.  Working with our Radium 96Boards IE board is a lot of fun.  It had been a while since I'd worked at the MCU level.  Bare-wire programming on an 8051 and using a dual-Arduino Uno plus ZigBee robot controller were highlights of my academic career, but I haven't done anything of the sort since.  The Radium's nice and small, IE compliant and has all the cool features of the Curie, like Bluetooth, 6-axis IMU and Neuron pattern recognition nodes.

For whatever reason, Intel decided to terminate their IoT-targeted endeavors.  Maybe it was the slow - and sometimes negative - response from the community.  It's also possible that the challenges in providing software support for their hardware were more monolithic than anticipated.  Either way, the Joule, Curie and Edison are gone.

For all of you who jumped on board with Intel's IoT hardware just over a year ago, I empathize with your plight.

LoRaWAN

If you're into IoT, you may have heard of LoRa, LoRaWAN and the LoRa Alliance.  It's a communication protocol for sub-GHz long range LPWANs, and it's sweeping Europe and North America's IIoT industry.  It works like this:  

You set up a Gateway. This is the equivalent of a WiFi router in your home, but the difference is these things can have a range of up to 15 km, depending on the quality of your antenna.

You deploy nodes.  These are your data acquisition points - temperature, presence detection, air quality, etc.  Whatever you need to know.  Put them where they need to be and hook them up to a battery, solar panel or hamster wheel (No hamsters were harmed in the writing of this blog post).  The idea is that they require very little power to run and can last anywhere from a week to several months on a single charge, or indefinitely with solar.  These tend to have a range of 2-5 km.

You monitor the data and use it as you see fit.

Gumstix released a gateway/concentrator and a transciever module in Geppetto, as well as a gateway dev board for both the Overo and the Raspberry Pi Compute Modules (Overo Conduit and Gumstix Pi Conduit boards), and a weather station sensor board (Strata Node).  They're in the store and available in both North American and European frequency bands.

Once I had my Gumstix Overo Conduit gateway and an RHF0M301 gateway/concentrator module in hand, I was impressed with how quick and easy it was to set up on thethingsnetwork.org.  The Strata node I recieved was pre-release and hadn't had the bootloader flashed yet (they come pre-flashed now), so it took a little longer, but writing a sketch and setting up a project on TTN and cayenne.mydevices.com went super-smoothly.  It just so happens that I made a bit of a quick-start video:

Arduino Stuff

Arduino is a great thing.  For artists, makers, inventors, amateur developers, and teachers, it's a great way to avoid the challenges of bare-wire programming and get physical objects doing what you want them to do.  For professionals, it's a good prototyping tool, delivering your proof of concept to the project manager in hours or days instead of weeks (or worse).

Adding the ATmega32U4 to the Geppetto library means I'll get a lot more time to play with Arduino hardware, projects, board support, and the IDE.  It also means that there will likely be more Arduino boards coming to the store and hardware modules coming to the Geppetto library.

I'm also going to have to find a quick and easy way to set up my 'arduino_pins.h' file.

Discovering Protocase

If you've seen my previous posts, chances are you've seen my low-tech enclosures, mounting brackets and test environments.  My indoor quadcopter test flight had a paracord tether tied to the rafters so that I didn't give my co-workers a hair cut.  I like to think of it as ISRU (In Situ Resource Utilization).  However, in some cases, a solid, well-made case is more than just a good idea.  When I went shopping for enclosures for my Overo Conduit board so that I could deploy it outside, my boss pointed me to protocase.com.  I think he just wanted me to stop asking for a 3D printer for the office.

These guys are awesome.  They're working on something for me and I can't wait to show it off.  They have a huge variety of custom products: L-shape, U-shape 5-sided, milled aluminum, and more!  They'll build from your CAD drawings and have free templates to help get started.  They even have their own design software for you to use.  If all else fails, they will work with you and design a fully customized enclosure for your device.


If you've got a prototype, an invention or a first-run for a kickstarter campaign, Protocase might be for you.  Just check out their page and see for yourself.


To Summarize:

I've been busy.  From grinding away at that internal project to working on LoRa and Arduino board support to designing enclosures to recovering from the Intel IoT fallout, I've hardly had enough time to catch my breath.  Now that things are settling down a bit, I am looking forward to spending more time telling you all about the cool stuff I'm working on.

Wednesday, February 15, 2017

There is Nodana...

96Boards

For those of you who don't know about the 96Boards open-specification hardware platform, it's a design spec for single-board computers (SBCs) that enables SoC vendors to provide their hardware in a standard form factor for increased compatibility.  It's also an engaged community working together to develop applications, software, and mezzanine cards for this ecosystem.

96Boards now has 3 different specifications for 3 classes of application.  There's Consumer Edition (CE), with standardized breakouts for both high-speed and low-speed signals, USB ports, HDMI, and so on.  There's also the Enterprise Edition (EE), which is more for server and networking applications.  It's a larger and more free-form design, with a low-speed header, USB and Ethernet, minimum 1 GB DRAM or expandable SODIMM slots, and optional 1 - 16 x PICe.  Finally there's the brand new IoT Edition (IE) spec.  It's designed to be tiny in order to fit anywhere.

All of these specifications have variants that allow hardware developers to add extra bits to their boards, making this a very flexible way of standardizing the important parts of SBCs.

The big benefit is that you can unite developer communities accross platforms.  The mezzanine card or maker project developed for board A will be compatible with board B, and vice versa.  With support from Linaro, providing a common Linux ecosystem for these boards, not even software compatibility should get in your way.

My honest opinion is that this open specification is very cool.

Gumstix is a 96Boards Partner

Yep, we're in cahoots with the folks at 96Boards and Linaro to bring you compliant hardware.  The release of the AeroCore 2 for Dragonboard 410C was only the start.  At the same time, we added the 96Boards Mezzanine Connector module to Geppetto D2O's library so that users can design their own mezzos for other applications.  If you don't know what Geppetto is, you can learn more by going to the Meet Geppetto page, read my earlier posts, or go straight to geppetto.gumstix.com and give it a try.

I did a demo for 96Boards OpenHours, hosted by Mr. Robert Wolff (@sdrobertw) and actually flew my MAV, using a Dragonboard and the AeroCore 2 live in my office -- complete with a visit from the "demo demon".  The whole thing's on YouTube.



...Only Joule

So for those of you who don't know, a little compute module was released last year with quite a lot of juice hidden under its heat dissipator. The Intel® Joule™ module delivers unprecedented compute power in a tiny package.  From its two 100-pin Hirose connectors pour USB 3.0, MIPI LVDS,  PCI Express, HDMI, and a lot of what you already expect from COMs and SoCs.  It also houses its own WiFi and Bluetooth hardware.  All with the power of a quad-core processor akin to the Core-I7s you find in your desktop PCs.

Surprise, surprise, Geppetto's got that too!  You can go in and build your own host board using the Intel module and harness most of what it has to offer.

So a Square Peg and a Round Hole Walk Into a Bar...


On one hand you have this fantastic open spec hardware platform [round hole].  In the other, this epic compute module [square peg].  "those will never fit together," you might say (in fact, one 96Boards community member did).  Well, we gumstixians are very resourceful.  And the spec doesn't restrict the SoC's architecture to ARM, that's just the expectation.  So what did we do?  We took all of the components that make the 96Boards Consumer Edition spec great, we wired it up to the Joule connectors, (tested it), gave it a name, and unleashed it on the unsuspecting masses.

And that is how the Nodana 96Boards Consumer Edition (96BCE) for the Intel Joule module came to be.  Here it is:

Gumstix Nodana Features

The Black Sheep


That's right, all you doubters.  Now you can test your 96Boards projects on a powerful 64-bit multi-core Intel chip.  It's the first of its kind -- the first non-ARM 96Boards device.  Take it for a spin and tell me about what you do with it.  You can order it at store.gumstix.com/nodana-96bce.html

x86 IoT Fun

Psst!  We are also taking the IE spec to this dimension.  Our Radium 96BIE board complies with the 96Boards IoT Edition specification and runs the Intel® Curie™ module.  A 32-bit Quark processor  in bed with an ARCv2 MCU, a 6-axis internal measurement unit (IMU) and an independently programmable Bluetooth controller. Check it out at store.gumstix.com/radium-96bie.html.