Showing posts with label cm3. Show all posts
Showing posts with label cm3. Show all posts

Tuesday, September 5, 2017

Updates: Intel Joule, LoRa, Arduino and Protocase

Blog Break

It has been a while since I posted a blog entry.  I have been knee-deep in a challenging internal project and haven't had much time to come up for air.  Today, I've got a chance to reflect on some of the things that have been happening here at Gumstix and share my perspective with you.

First, there's the EOL announcement from Intel that blindsided the x86-focused IoT community:
 the Joule, Edison, and Curie modules are soon to be no more than a footnote in the history of embedded computing.

Also, Just recently, hardware support for LoRaWAN was added to the Geppetto module library and 3 LoRa boards were released.  I got to play with that quite a bit.  It also brought with it an ATmega32U4 Geppetto module, supplanting the Curie module as our primary Arduino-compatible MCU.

Finally, I've been talking a lot with Protocase.  These guys are cool.  They provide design and production services for custom small-run enclosures, rackmounts, brackets, and consolets. I'm very excited to see what they're making for me.

Intel EOL Announcements and Me

I'll admit it, I took the Intel Joule news harder than maybe I should have.  I spent a lot of time working with it and it's carrier boards.  I was looking forward to putting the GadgetDrone in the air with the AeroCore 2 for Joule, the Caspa HD and one of the RealSense point cloud cameras we have at the office.  I liked the idea of setting up my Workstation board in a 3D-printed enclosure as a Yocto build slave.  Oh and I still hope to test the Caspa 4K's "tone-mapping (Er, I mean HDR) Video" mode.


I was also sad to see the Curie go.  Working with our Radium 96Boards IE board is a lot of fun.  It had been a while since I'd worked at the MCU level.  Bare-wire programming on an 8051 and using a dual-Arduino Uno plus ZigBee robot controller were highlights of my academic career, but I haven't done anything of the sort since.  The Radium's nice and small, IE compliant and has all the cool features of the Curie, like Bluetooth, 6-axis IMU and Neuron pattern recognition nodes.

For whatever reason, Intel decided to terminate their IoT-targeted endeavors.  Maybe it was the slow - and sometimes negative - response from the community.  It's also possible that the challenges in providing software support for their hardware were more monolithic than anticipated.  Either way, the Joule, Curie and Edison are gone.

For all of you who jumped on board with Intel's IoT hardware just over a year ago, I empathize with your plight.

LoRaWAN

If you're into IoT, you may have heard of LoRa, LoRaWAN and the LoRa Alliance.  It's a communication protocol for sub-GHz long range LPWANs, and it's sweeping Europe and North America's IIoT industry.  It works like this:  

You set up a Gateway. This is the equivalent of a WiFi router in your home, but the difference is these things can have a range of up to 15 km, depending on the quality of your antenna.

You deploy nodes.  These are your data acquisition points - temperature, presence detection, air quality, etc.  Whatever you need to know.  Put them where they need to be and hook them up to a battery, solar panel or hamster wheel (No hamsters were harmed in the writing of this blog post).  The idea is that they require very little power to run and can last anywhere from a week to several months on a single charge, or indefinitely with solar.  These tend to have a range of 2-5 km.

You monitor the data and use it as you see fit.

Gumstix released a gateway/concentrator and a transciever module in Geppetto, as well as a gateway dev board for both the Overo and the Raspberry Pi Compute Modules (Overo Conduit and Gumstix Pi Conduit boards), and a weather station sensor board (Strata Node).  They're in the store and available in both North American and European frequency bands.

Once I had my Gumstix Overo Conduit gateway and an RHF0M301 gateway/concentrator module in hand, I was impressed with how quick and easy it was to set up on thethingsnetwork.org.  The Strata node I recieved was pre-release and hadn't had the bootloader flashed yet (they come pre-flashed now), so it took a little longer, but writing a sketch and setting up a project on TTN and cayenne.mydevices.com went super-smoothly.  It just so happens that I made a bit of a quick-start video:

Arduino Stuff

Arduino is a great thing.  For artists, makers, inventors, amateur developers, and teachers, it's a great way to avoid the challenges of bare-wire programming and get physical objects doing what you want them to do.  For professionals, it's a good prototyping tool, delivering your proof of concept to the project manager in hours or days instead of weeks (or worse).

Adding the ATmega32U4 to the Geppetto library means I'll get a lot more time to play with Arduino hardware, projects, board support, and the IDE.  It also means that there will likely be more Arduino boards coming to the store and hardware modules coming to the Geppetto library.

I'm also going to have to find a quick and easy way to set up my 'arduino_pins.h' file.

Discovering Protocase

If you've seen my previous posts, chances are you've seen my low-tech enclosures, mounting brackets and test environments.  My indoor quadcopter test flight had a paracord tether tied to the rafters so that I didn't give my co-workers a hair cut.  I like to think of it as ISRU (In Situ Resource Utilization).  However, in some cases, a solid, well-made case is more than just a good idea.  When I went shopping for enclosures for my Overo Conduit board so that I could deploy it outside, my boss pointed me to protocase.com.  I think he just wanted me to stop asking for a 3D printer for the office.

These guys are awesome.  They're working on something for me and I can't wait to show it off.  They have a huge variety of custom products: L-shape, U-shape 5-sided, milled aluminum, and more!  They'll build from your CAD drawings and have free templates to help get started.  They even have their own design software for you to use.  If all else fails, they will work with you and design a fully customized enclosure for your device.


If you've got a prototype, an invention or a first-run for a kickstarter campaign, Protocase might be for you.  Just check out their page and see for yourself.


To Summarize:

I've been busy.  From grinding away at that internal project to working on LoRa and Arduino board support to designing enclosures to recovering from the Intel IoT fallout, I've hardly had enough time to catch my breath.  Now that things are settling down a bit, I am looking forward to spending more time telling you all about the cool stuff I'm working on.

Friday, March 17, 2017

Gumstix Pi Compute Boards are CM3-Ready


If you follow me on twitter (@gstixguru), you might know that I recently ordered an RPi CM3.  Lots of people have been contacting us to find out how well our Pi Compute boards support the new, faster module, so I found a bit of time to play around with it.  I'd worked with the original CM on our dev board for my GPS and RTK project a year ago with great success, and was looking forward to getting back to the Pi Compute boards.

First Steps

As always, my first step was to flash a brand new image onto the CM's eMMC.  I downloaded the latest Raspbian Jessie Lite ISO and mounted my CM on a Gumstix Pi FastFlash.  Next, I ran rpiboot, plugged the board into my USB hub and CROSSED MY FINGERS!

RPi CM3 on a FastFlash getting flashed. Pardon the clutter.
So what happened next?  Exactly what should:  the eMMC was mounted to my file system like any unpartitioned flash drive would be.  So I dd'ed the image, moved the module over to the Gumstix Pi Compute Dev Board and got ready to Pi.

First Boot

At first, all I wanted was proof of life.  That and I was sure the default wpa supplicant and network interfaces config would not get me on the WiFi network.  So I screen'ed in and powered up the board.  And yes, the console came to life, spewing forth those familiar Linux startup messages.  No kernel panic, no errors, no problem.  So far so good. Raspbian Lite was up and running.  Oh, all the things I should test: GPIOs, I2C, SPI....  BORING!

Let's start with USB (Oh, and get the WiFi up and running while we're at it; screen is not my friend and SSH makes me smile:).  The WiFi dongle goes into the port and lsusb shows a list of devices.  And there it is.


Bus 001 Device 002: ID 148f:5370 Ralink Technology, Corp. RT5370 Wireless Adapter

Beautiful.  I fix up /etc/network/interfaces and add the office WiFi network to wpa_supplicant.config and shut it down.  Time to set this asside and get back to my other tasks.

Day 2

Before ditching the USB console connection, I have to go into raspi-config and enable the SSH host, and reconfigure the daemon:


sudo rm /etc/ssh/ssh_host_*
sudo dpkg-reconfigure openssh_server
After a restart, ssh works fine.


Let's got straight up the food chain to the camera!  That's what I want to see!  I want to get that Sony IMX219 taking stills and recording videos.  I want to see those LVDS signals in action.  The CSI-2 camera connector is by far my favorite feature of the dev board.  So while I was in raspi-config, I made sure to enable the camera as well.

Here's my Frankenberry Pi camera rig, ready to go, I hope.
So I hooked it up, fired up the module and... nothing.  Did I forget something?  Of course I did! I needed the device tree overlay blob for the camera.  Oops.  OK, so I grab the binary, -- I get the one for both camera and display, just because I can -- copy it to the boot partition and restart.

And did it work?  See for yourself:
Me and my clipboard.
Edit: Here's me trying to pretend I'm not being recorded by the Pi Camera:


Also

I also took a few minutes and got the USB-Ethernet board fired up, and yes, everything works great.
I am very happy.  Stay tuned!  I have a Raspberry Pi DSI display around here somewhere and I want to get that up and running too.